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Items filtered by date: July 2022

Athlete’s foot is a pesky affliction of the foot that you may experience at some point in your life. The condition is a kind of fungal infection that is spread in warm, moist environments. Most typically, athlete’s foot can be spread to someone when they walk barefoot in highly-trafficked public areas where the fungus is present such as pool sides and locker rooms. There are several risk factors associated with athlete’s foot. First, if you are someone who usually wears damp or tight-fitting shoes, socks, or stockings, then you are increasing your risk of developing athlete’s foot. Wearing this kind of shoe or sock for prolonged periods can essentially trap the fungus, enabling it to thrive and wreak havoc on your feet. Additionally, if you are someone who suffers from persistently sweaty feet, then you may be at a greater risk of developing athlete’s foot. Those with conditions such as HIV-AIDS who have impaired immune systems are also particularly susceptible to suffering from athlete’s foot, as such individuals have a difficult time fighting off the fungus. If you identify with any of these risk factor groups, it might be a good idea to contact a podiatrist who can help ward off athlete’s foot. 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Ryan W. Wood from Desert Foot & Ankle Surgeons.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Palm Springs and El Paseo, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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The medical term for the foot condition known as Morton’s neuroma is Morton’s metatarsalgia or interdigital neuroma. It is an ailment that affects the area between the third and fourth toes, and is quite painful. The pain is often felt in the ball of the foot and between the toes. It occurs as a result of a nerve that thickens between the toes, and can happen from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. High heels generally fit into this category. Additionally,  people who participate in high-impact physical activities that consist of running and jumping may be affected. Many patients with Morton's neuroma experience severe pain and find it difficult to walk. It may begin with a tingling or numbing sensation, and may gradually develop into a shooting pain. It can be likened to walking with a pebble or marble in the shoe. In mild cases, relief may come from implementing simple lifestyle changes, such as wearing comfortable shoes and refraining from running and jumping. Surgery that can reset the nerve may be an option in severe cases. If you have this type of foot pain, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Morton’s neuroma. 

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Ryan W. Wood of Desert Foot & Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Palm Springs and El Paseo, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 12 July 2022 00:00

Types of Foot Ulcers

Patients who are diabetic may be familiar with wound care for the feet. Elevated blood sugar levels may cause a foot ulcer to gradually develop and immediate treatment may be necessary to avoid further implications, including amputation in severe cases. There are several types of foot ulcers that diabetic patients may experience. Neuropathy can cause a lack of feeling in the foot and patients are unable to feel the pain caused by an injury. A loss of blood flow to the feet can lead to an ischemic ulcer which can be difficult to treat. If the patient has poor circulation and neuropathy, a neuroischemic ulcer may form and it is said to be the most difficult to heal. Approximately half of foot ulcers become infected, therefore they need to be closely monitored. Diabetic foot ulcer treatment begins with removing infected tissue from the wound. This is called debridement and it is crucial in the prevention of damaged nerves, blood vessels, and tendons. This is followed by reducing existing pressure on the foot ulcer and draining the wound. If you have diabetes, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can treat and manage diabetic foot problems.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Ryan W. Wood from Desert Foot & Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Palm Springs and El Paseo, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 05 July 2022 00:00

Tips to Remedy Cracked Heels

Approximately 20% of all adults in the United States will experience heel fissures, or “cracked heels,” at least once during their lifetime. Cracked heels typically occur when the skin surrounding one’s heel becomes noticeably tough, dry, and thick. The dried skin around the heel can eventually crack, creating fissures. The risk of developing cracked heels is markedly higher during the winter season when the colder weather typically makes the skin drier. If you are experiencing cracked heels, you may be able to make use of several at-home remedies. For example, you may soak your feet in water for approximately 20 minutes and use a pumice stone to gently remove the hardened skin cells. Afterwards, you may apply a heavy-duty moisturizer to the back of your heel. Typically, moisturizers containing ingredients such as petroleum jelly or glycerin can effectively nourish the skin. To address cracked heels, you might also use alpha-hydroxy acids or urea to target hardened skin cells and effectively remove them from your heels. If at-home remedies like these fail to mitigate cracked heels, this could be a sign to consult a podiatrist. Ultimately, cracked heels can be an unsightly annoyance, but you and your podiatrist can take steps to address the affliction. 

If the skin on your feet starts to crack, you may want to see a podiatrist to find treatment. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Ryan W. Wood from Desert Foot & Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

It is important to moisturize your cracked heels in order to prevent pain, bleeding, and infection. The reason cracked heels form is because the skin on the foot is too dry to support the immense pressure placed on them. When the foot expands, the dry skin on the foot begins to split.

Ways to Help Heal Them

  • Invest in a good foot cream
  • Try Using Petroleum Jelly
  • Ease up on Soaps
  • Drink Plenty of Water

Ways to Prevent Cracked Heels

  • Moisturize After Showering
  • Skip a Shower
  • Keep Shower Water Lukewarm
  • Don’t Scrub Your Feet

If you are unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels, seek guidance from a podiatrist. Your doctor will help you with any questions or information you may need. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Palm Springs and El Paseo, CA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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